Winter Storm Xanto Closes Twin Cities Schools Again Monday; Hundreds of Thousands Still Lack Power

Sean Breslin
Published: April 16, 2018

Schools in the Twin Cities and Green Bay remained closed on Monday as the impacts of Winter Storm Xanto lingered after delivering yet another snowy blast for the upper Midwest over the weekend.

With more than a foot of fresh snow on the ground in some areas, Minneapolis officials said the decision to call off school on Monday was twofold: buses would have difficulty navigating side streets, and bus drivers might not be able to see children standing behind tall snowbanks, according to the Associated Press.

In addition to the school closures, some Wisconsin government offices were closed because of the storm, and the Green Bay Packers announced the start of their offseason program was delayed one day because the players couldn't make it to the team's facility.

(MORE: Another Winter Storm Possible This Week?)

Three deaths have been blamed on the winter storm. The Nebraska State Patrol said Rollo Ward, 61, of Idaho Falls, was killed Friday when the semi-trailer he was driving lost control near Chappell in western Nebraska and crashed into a second semi-trailer that had become stranded in the blizzard, the AP reported.

According to the Columbia County Sheriff's Office in Wisconsin, a 30-year-old woman from Poynette was killed when she lost control of her minivan early Saturday morning and struck an SUV on Highway 16 near Lewiston. Three passengers in the minivan and the driver of the SUV were transported to an area hospital with injuries, the AP reported.

Officials also said 52-year-old Daniel Harris died of heart failure while shoveling snow at his girlfriend's apartment complex in Milwaukee on Sunday.

New England Schools Delayed, Closed

As the storm's wintry mix moved into New England, many students were kept at home with travel conditions becoming dangerous Monday morning. Several school districts in the region delayed or canceled classes Monday, according to the AP.

(MORE: Deadly Severe Storms Batter the South)

The storm system also brought heavy rain to the New York City area, and at both LaGuardia Airport and John F. Kennedy International Airport, ground stops were in place Monday morning. More than 550 flights into and out of the three biggest NYC-area airports were canceled Monday, according to the flight-tracking website FlightAware.

Outages, Evacuations in Michigan

Nearly a quarter-million Michigan homes and businesses remained without power Monday morning, according to PowerOutage.us.

About a dozen homes had to be evacuated in Monroe County, Michigan, after water began to impact Bolles Harbor communities, the National Weather Service reported. Several streets were flooded along the shoreline.

Roughly 200 people were rescued from their flooded homes along Lake Erie in Luna Pier Sunday, the Monroe News reported.

"We couldn’t believe the waves," resident Cheryl Krakow told the Monroe News. "They were just booming."

In Midwest, Travel a Mess for Days

From Friday through Sunday morning, more than 400 crashes occurred on Minnesota roads, according to the state patrol. More than 50 injuries were reported, two of which were listed as serious. One death occurred when a man in Medina ran across a highway and was struck by a vehicle.

Sunday officials reopened Interstate 90 from Sioux Falls to the Minnesota border and I-29 from Summit to Sioux Falls.

(MORE: When Spring's Last Snow Usually Happens)

At Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport, 300 flights were canceled Sunday, according to FlightAware. The terminal saw more than 450 cancellations Saturday.

Heavy snow collapsed the roof of an Econo Lodge hotel in Brown County, Wisconsin, Sunday, according to the NWS. No injuries were reported.

"This winter storm is historic for the month of April in several cities, including Green Bay, Wisconsin, and Sioux Falls, South Dakota, which on Saturday both saw their heaviest one-day April snowfall on record," said weather.com meteorologist Chris Dolce.


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